Sunday, April 6, 2008

On Radar

As of late I've been consulting with New Design High School in the LES, a design school with a holistic focus dedicated to the education of urban youth. Basic core education is taught with emphasis on design in addition to programs including music and graffiti.

In an effort to save school programming due to massive budget cuts, New Design has recently launched its rooftop as an event space and set its sight on a fundraising goal of $50,000.

The NDHS roof top space is a city block long and located on the corner of Grand and Essex. (Perfect for Summer Time Events!) The site also currently contains the “Rooftop Legends,” where legends of urban art come together to create an outdoor museum space to celebrate various mediums of art and popular culture.

Peep the videos' that will drop via The New Pop today. Thanks to Tone and Trev for coming through on this for me! Guaranteed to be the on radar for summer events!! Stay tuned for more things to drop soon ....

Part 1:

Part 2:

For Roof Top Views

Make an appointment to visit the site before applying. Contact Sarah Baltazar at or 212.475.4148 to schedule a visit.

To Make Donations:
(NDHS is a non-profit 501c3 status)

New Design High School (NDHS) is a small academic high school with a focus on design, located in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the Seward Park Campus. The school uses the concept of design to assist in meeting the holistic needs of adolescents, including the academic, intellectual, social, emotional and artistic sides of students. The school opened five years, graduating its founding class in June, 2007, as part of the small school movement for NYC public schools.

NDHS is committed to working with urban youth, often disfranchised, and exposing them to a vigorous educational environment. Close to 50% of the student population are placed into the school through a lottery system. Generally, these students come to the school with low test scores, lower attendance rates and lower scholarship rates. Over 70% of the NDHS student population is below the poverty level and 75% enter the school behind grade level in math and literacy based on city and state testing.

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